Hatcher Pass Avalanche Center

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ARCHIVED FORECAST - All forecasts expire after 24 hours from the posting date/time.
Issued
Wed, April 17th, 2019 - 7:00AM
Expires
Thu, April 18th, 2019 - 7:00AM
Forecaster
HPAC Staff
The Bottom Line

Head’s Up Hatcher Pass! Winter is not over yet….

Hatcher Pass received 24″ of new snow overnight above 3000′ and approx 12″ of new snow at low elevation, combined with moderate wind gusts SSE 10-19 mph for several hours at upper elevation.

The avalanche problems for today are Storm Slab, Wind Slab, and Dry Loose.

The avalanche danger will be CONSIDERABLE today at mid and upper elevation, on all aspects, on slopes above 30º.  Prior to the storm, surface hoar, near surface facets, and crusts blanketed the landscape. New snow will likely not bond well to these pre-existing snow surfaces and contribute to the avalanche problem.

Snow falling on a mix of ground and snow surfaces with less overall new snow will mean smaller avalanches are expected in the lower elevations with MODERATE danger for storm slabs and dry loose avalanches, on slopes 35º and steeper.

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Wed, April 17th, 2019
Upper Elevation
Above 3,500'
Considerable (3)
Avalanche risk
Mid Elevation
2,500'-3,500'
Considerable (3)
Avalanche risk
Low Elevation
Below 2,500'
Moderate (2)
Avalanche risk
Upper Elevation
Above 3,500'
Avalanche risk
Considerable (3)
Mid Elevation
2,500'-3,500'
Avalanche risk
Considerable (3)
Low Elevation
Below 2,500'
Avalanche risk
Moderate (2)
Danger Scale:
No Rating (0)
Low (1)
Moderate (2)
Considerable (3)
High (4)
Extreme (5)
Avalanche Problem 1
  • Storm Slabs
    Storm Slabs
Storm Slabs
Storm Slab avalanches are the release of a cohesive layer (a slab) of new snow that breaks within new snow or on the old snow surface. Storm-slabs typically last between a few hours and few days (following snowfall). Storm-slabs that form over a persistent weak layer (surface hoar, depth hoar, or near-surface facets) may be termed Persistent Slabs or may develop into Persistent Slabs.
More info at Avalanche.org

Due to a recent intense storm overnight 4/16-17 and moderate winds at upper elevation, natural avalanches most likely have occurred today. Poor visibility and storm conditions have made it challenging to confirm recent activity.

Human triggered small wind slabs were observed on leeward aspects at upper elevation Sat and Sun.

Dry loose naturals were observed on leeward aspects at upper elevation Sat and Sun.

Weather
Wed, April 17th, 2019

NWS Rec Forecast here.

NWS point forecast here.

State Parks Snow Report and Motorized Access information here.

Observations
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