Hatcher Pass Avalanche Center

Hatcher Pass RSS

Archives
ARCHIVED - Forecasts expire after 24 hours.
Issued
Sat, March 16th, 2024 - 7:00AM
Expires
Sun, March 17th, 2024 - 7:00AM
Forecaster
Allie Barker
Avalanche risk The Bottom Line

The avalanche danger remains at a LOW hazard at all elevations.

Excellent stability and cool temperatures have preserved snow quality in many locations.

It may be possible to trigger small avalanches in isolated terrain.

A couple inches of new snow is in the forecast for Saturday through Sunday.

Special Announcements

Join us for a little something different. HPAC will be hosting Mountain in My Mind Vol. 1 at the Bear Tooth Theatrepub & Grill. Along with the film, there will be a mental health/outdoor recreation panel discussion led by Sarah Histand (Mind & Mountain), Tucker Chenoweth (Denali National Park), and Kathleen Heiskell (Redside Alliance). Get tickets here!

Sat, March 16th, 2024
Upper Elevation
Above 3,500'
1 - Low
Avalanche risk
Mid Elevation
2,500'-3,500'
1 - Low
Avalanche risk
Low Elevation
Below 2,500'
1 - Low
Avalanche risk
Sun, March 17th, 2024
Upper Elevation
Above 3,500'
1 - Low
Avalanche risk
Mid Elevation
2,500'-3,500'
1 - Low
Avalanche risk
Low Elevation
Below 2,500'
1 - Low
Avalanche risk
Sun, March 17th, 2024
Upper Elevation
Above 3,500'
1 - Low
Avalanche risk
Mid Elevation
2,500'-3,500'
1 - Low
Avalanche risk
Low Elevation
Below 2,500'
1 - Low
Avalanche risk
0 - No Rating
1 - Low
2 - Moderate
3 - Considerable
4 - High
5 - Extreme
Avalanche risk Avalanche risk Avalanche risk Avalanche risk Avalanche risk
Travel Advice Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features. Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern. Dangerous avalanche conditions. Careful snowpack evaluation, cautious route-finding, and conservative decision-making essential. Very dangerous avalanche conditions. Travel in avalanche terrain not recommended. Extraordinarily dangerous avalanche conditions. Avoid all avalanche terrain.
Likelihood of Avalanches Natural and human-triggered avalanches unlikely. Natural avalanches unlikely; human-triggered avalanches possible. Natural avalanches possible; human-triggered avalanches likely. Natural avalanches likely; human-triggered avalanches very likely. Natural and human-triggered avalanches certain.
Avalanche Size and Distribution Small avalanches in isolated areas or extreme terrain. Small avalanches in specific areas; or large avalanches in isolated areas. Small avalanches in many areas; or large avalanches in specific areas; or very large avalanches in isolated areas. Large avalanches in many areas; or very large avalanches in specific areas. Very large avalanches in many areas.
Recent Avalanches

Moderate temperatures and light winds have continued to contribute to stability over the past few days.  A couple small D1 wind slabs were triggered on Wednesday and Friday on Peak 4068′ on north and east aspects. No one was caught or carried.

No significant dry loose sluffs have been reported since 3/4. No large slab avalanches have been reported since 2/24.

 

3/15 Small D1 human triggered wind slab on a Peak 4068′ ENE aspect Photo: Rachel Minick

 

Recent Conditions

Good stability has promoted many people to lay down tracks in steeper and more consequential terrain over the past couple weeks. Martin Mine

Avalanche Problem 1
  • Normal Caution
    Normal Caution
Normal Caution
Normal Caution means triggering an avalanche is unlikely but not impossible.
More info at Avalanche.org

We have been riding the wave of LOW avalanche danger for more consecutive forecasts than ever compared to the past 16 years.  No major weather events have contributed to instability in the snowpack this week.  This remarkable stretch of excellent weather and cooler temperatures has assisted in preserving snow quality in many locations.

Triggering any type of avalanche will be unlikely today. However, low danger does not mean no danger.  It will be possible to human trigger a small wind slab on leeward aspects, west to north (clockwise) above 3500′, on isolated terrain features near ridgeline or crossloaded slopes.

The general Normal Caution wording reads as follows: This is not a specific avalanche problem. It is used by HPAC forecasters most often when avalanche conditions are generally safe and there is no predominant avalanche problem. Any avalanche type is possible but the most common would be wind slab, loose dry, and loose wet avalanches and they would be expected to be small. Do not approach a Normal Caution avalanche problem as an “anything goes” situation. Continue to keep your guard up and look for any signs of instability in the snowpack. Evaluate snow and weather conditions as you travel.

 

 

 

Weather
Sat, March 16th, 2024

NWS AVG Forecast here.

NWS point forecast here.

Marmot Weather Station here.

Independence Mine Snotel here.

Frostbite Bottom Snotel here.

State Parks Snow Report and Motorized Access information here.

XC trail grooming report for Mat-Su, Anchorage, and Kenai here.

Observations
Recent Observations for Hatcher Pass